My current teaching activities are at The Hague University of Applied Science (HHS). From November 2006 until March 2011 I taught at the University of Madeira (UMa). In the 10 years before that, I taught at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e).

Over the years, I have taught the following topics:

The Hague University of Applied SciencesCommunication & Multimedia Design programme at HHS
University of MadeiraInteractive Media Design programme at UMa
Carnegie Mellon UniversityProfessional Master of Human-Computer Interaction at UMa & CMU
Civil Engineering programme at UMa
Design programme at UMa
Eindhoven University of TechnologyArchitecture, Building and Planning programme at TU/e

 

At The Hague University of Applied Sciences (2011 – …)

In my current job, my teaching activities are in the domain of Interaction Design. Most of our teaching is organised around Project-Based Learning (PBL) and each term students engage in a single project tutored by a team of experts. My contribution focuses on interaction design and design methods. I also teach an elective course on Frame Creation, which is an approach to Design Thinking.

In terms of management, my role at The Hague is to chair the Curriculum Board.

 

At the University of Madeira (2006 – 2011)

LDMI logoDepartment of Mathematics and Engineering

I was author and director of the undergraduate programme on Interactive Media Design that I initiated in 2007 and started in September 2008.

CMU Portugal logo I was also local co-director (with Nuno Nunes as director) of the Professional Master of Human-Computer Interaction, a dual degree programme with Carnegie Mellon University.

In 2006-2008, I also taught in the Design course of the Department of Art and Design. As director I tranformed this four-year graduate course into an three-year Bachelor course in Design that prepares for a two-year Master course in Design and Multimedia.

 

Hypermedia Design

HMD 2nd year BScLike any other area of design, hypermedia design requires a thorough knowledge of the medium that is targeted in the design process. The chosen medium poses constraints and requirements on the graphical aspects of design and has consequences for the production process. Students will learn to know the production process of a website and get acquainted with the technologies and the implications for the graphical design of a website. Designing a website involves a thorough study of both the technical requirements and the artistic expectations of the target audience. The creative process that leads to a successful site is challenging and complex, but can be consciously driven in a structured manner. Students are exposed to a structure approach to creative web design and will practise in assignments. At the end of the course, students:

  • have knowledge about the various aspects of web-based communication;
  • have knowledge about the various technologies currently in use in web-development;
  • have knowledge of and experience with the creative process of designing a website for a specific purpose and target audience;
  • have hands-on experience with the development of a website that has both graphical and technical quality, is technically consistent, and meets the requirements of user-friendliness and maintainability;
  • have hands-on experience with developing dynamic aspects of websites, through the usage of various techniques, including Flash and scripting technologies.

This discipline involves expanding the students’ graphical design qualities, targeting the web as the communication medium. The main issue being studied is the relationship between graphical design aspects and technical aspects of websites. The discipline consists of three components:

  1. A theoretical component offering a general overview of web-based technologies, their potential and limitations;
  2. A practical component focused on the development of information-based websites, using the standardised techniques of HTML and CSS;
  3. A practical component focused on the development of dynamic aspects of websites, using standardised scripting techniques as well as non-standardised techniques such as Flash.

 

Interaction Design

ID 3rd year BScThis is a studio class in which students are guided through a number of assignments that involve the design of various kinds of interfaces and elements of human-computer interaction. The objective is to teach the fundamentals of interaction design, as well as to let students gain experience with the process of design. Students will learn to appreciate the importance, difficulty, and complexity of UI design. On completion of this course, students will have gained the following competences:

  • Understanding of and practical experience with the fundamental concepts, methods, and practices of interaction design.
  • Ability to explore the ideas of “form follows interaction” and “be the user”.
  • Ability to explore how users develop attachment with products through identification.
  • Understanding of the role that interaction with products plays in mediating relationships between people and people, people and places, and people and products.
  • Ability to present design ideas.

This course engages the students in analytical design research tasks, focused on specific design problems. Students will first identify issues to be resolved and the opportunities for improvement and innovation, leading to the design of high-quality software interfaces.

Pictographic design by Mónica Nascimento (2007)Pictographic design by Mónica Nascimento (2007)

 

Design Project

DP 3rd year BScThe objective of this projects is to gain experience with a realistic and complete design cycle in a collaboration context. Building on the knowledge and skills from the first two years of the Interactive Media Design course, students will now practice their skills in a project of their choice that mimics a real-world situation. This allows students on the one hand to deepen and confirm their designer’s capabilities, specialising in the area of their preference, while on the other hand it requires students to become aware and take into account all the constraints and other aspects of a commercial design project. It involves situating their design activities in a larger context, relating it to competing designs and the client’s intent. It also involves developing the commercial qualities of their design and communicating these with the client. A secondary objective is to develop students’ design collaboration competences. While this project advances through the creative design cycle that students already have experienced in previous disciplines, this project particularly involves an integral approach to design in which the communication with the client is a key aspect. This allows the student to learn to target the client’s needs while at the same time ensuring and defending a high standard of design quality. This is achieved by following a strong methodical approach to design development, from analysis of the context to conceptualisation of the design objective. Students work together in design teams, learning to play different roles in the creative process as well as different roles in the collaboration process, experiencing the various social and organisational aspects of collaboration.

 

Interface and Interaction Design

IID 1st year MasterThis is a studio class in which students are guided through a number of assignments that involve the design of various kinds of interfaces and elements of human-computer interaction. The objective is to teach the fundamentals of interaction design, as well as to let students gain experience with the process of design. Students will learn to appreciate the importance, difficulty, and complexity of UI design. On completion of this course, students will have gained the following competences:

  • Understanding of and practical experience with the fundamental concepts, methods, and practices of interaction design.
  • Ability to explore the ideas of “form follows interaction” and “be the user”.
  • Ability to explore how users develop attachment with products through identification.
  • Understanding of the role that interaction with products plays in mediating relationships between people and people, people and places, and people and products.
  • Ability to present design ideas.

This course involves the students in analytical design research tasks, focused on specific design problems. Students will first identify issues to be resolved and the opportunities for improvement and innovation, leading to the design of high-quality software interfaces.

 

Computer Aided Design

DG/AC 1st year BScThis discipline offers a theoretical introduction as well as hands-on experience with Computer Aided Design software, for usage in areas of Architectural and Civil Design. At the end of this discipline, the student will have acquired the competences to be able to or have knowledge of:

  1. Model of a residence, by Nelson Fernandes (2007)Model of a residence, by Nelson Fernandes (2007) Technical 2D sketching:
    1. Taking the measures of an existing building;
    2. Making 2D sketches of a building in plan, elevation, and section;
    3. Making 2D sketches of a building in isometric and perspective view;
    4. Adding dimensions and annotations to 2D sketches.
  2. Theory of Building Information Modelling (BIM):
    1. The objectives, history, and characteristics of BIM;
    2. The various kinds of geometric modelling approaches and their uses;
    3. The various kinds of semantic modelling approaches and abstraction mechanisms;
    4. The complexity of BIM and its application in practice.
  3. Model of a residence, by Nelson Fernandes (2007)Model of a residence, by Nelson Fernandes (2007) Technical 3D modelling:
    1. Making a conceptual design model with Revit;
    2. Converting 2D sketches manually into a 3D model;
    3. Working with the component model in Revit;
    4. Working with the constraint system in Revit;
    5. Creating technical drawings from the 3D model;
    6. Creating other construction documents from the 3D model.

The discipline is split up into two sections:

  • Section 1: Technical 2D sketching
  • Section 2: Technical 3D modelling

In Section 1, the student will create a number of technical sketches of a building that are then taken as the point of departure for Section 2, where the student will create a 3D building information model of the same building. The subject of the sketching and modelling exercises is the house that the student inhabits. The student will take precise measures of the house and create the sketches and models respectively from these measures.

 

Design Project I and II – Integral design projects

DP-I/II 3rd year BScThe objective of these projects is to gain experience with a realistic and complete design cycle in a collaboration context. Building on the knowledge and skills from the first two years of the design course, students will now practice their skills in a project of their choice that mimics a real-world situation. This allows students on the one hand to deepen and confirm their designer’s capabilities, specialising in the area of their preference, while on the other hand it requires students to become aware and take into account all the constraints and other aspects of a commercial design project. It involves situating their design activities in a larger context, relating it to competing designs and the client’s intent. It also involves developing the commercial qualities of their design and communicating these with the client.

Logo design by Luciana Caires (2007)Logo design by Luciana Caires (2007) A secondary objective is to develop students’ design collaboration competences. While this project advances through the creative design cycle that students already have experienced in previous disciplines, this project particularly involves an integral approach to design in which the communication with the client is a key aspect. This allows the student to learn to target the client’s needs while at the same time ensuring and defending a high standard of design quality. This is achieved by following a strong methodical approach to design development, from analysis of the context to conceptualisation of the design objective. Students work together in design teams, learning to play different roles in the creative process as well as different roles in the collaboration process, experiencing the various social and organisational aspects of collaboration. Last year’s students’ work was exhibited in ‘Madeira Shopping’, the local main shopping centre, during 4 weeks.

Office furniture design by Marco Correia (2007)Office furniture design by Marco Correia (2007)   Water fountain, design by Miguel Caldeira, Cristian Júnior, and Mónica Nascimento (2006)Water fountain, design by Miguel Caldeira, Cristian Júnior, and Mónica Nascimento (2006)

 

Design VI – Web design

DSG-VI 3rd year BScThe objective of this discipline is to bring the graphic design capabilities that students have acquired in the previous design disciplines to the area of the world-wide-web. The web poses not only particular constraints and requirements on the graphical aspects of design, it also involves a completely different production process. Students will learn to know the production process of a website, get acquainted with the technologies and the implications for the graphical design of a website. This discipline only partly involves expanding the students graphical design qualities. The main issue being studied is the relationship between graphical design aspects and technical aspects of websites. The discipline consists of three components:

  1. A theoretical component offering a general overview of web-based technologies, their potential and limitations;
  2. A practical component focused on the development of information-based websites, using the standardised techniques of HTML and CSS;
  3. A practical component focused on the development of dynamic aspects of websites, using standardised scripting techniques as well as non-standardised techniques such as Flash.

 

At Eindhoven University of Technology (1997 – 2006)

From 1997 – 2006 I have been teaching at Eindhoven University of Technology, in the Department of Architecture, Building, and Planning. In the Design Systems Group, I was accountable for the group’s educational activities in the BSc, MSc, and Post-graduate programmes of the department. Particularly, I was coordinator of the MSc specialisation on Design & Decision Support Systems (DDSS). In the department, I have been member of the educational auditing committee for about 2 years. In 2005/2006, I was a member of the management team for International Education. In the MSc degree, I was tutor of graduate students in projects and supervisor of graduation projects on Building Information Technology. I was also academic mentor for students, advising them in planning their MSc curriculum and setting up a personal development plan. For our PhD students, I was co-advisor in their research projects. The tables below show an overview of the lectures I have been teaching in the Design Systems Group.

 

Computer Aided Architectural Design

7m254 2nd year BSc 7m254Sample from course results. After students have learned in their first year how to create 3D models of architecture, this course in the second year focuses on how to use CAAD tools for actually making a design. In the lectures, we present and discuss morphological principles and architectural concepts of harmony, referring to exemplary architects. These principles and concepts can be related to the more technical principles of geometric modelling, such as transformation and deformation. Then, we focus on how using these tools can influence the design process and how students can learn to keep control of the design, rather than loosing themselves in the features of the tool. The second aspect of the course is visualisation. The objective is not to create photo-realistic images, but rather to convey an image, an ambience, to the observer. Using the characteristics of light, shadow, texture, and perspective, students learn how to create scenes that communicate the essence of their design.

 

Collaborative Design

7m832 1st year MSc and 1st year PDEng Since 2002, I was principal lecturer of the course Collaborative Design that I taught with my colleagues van Gassel and den Otter. The objectives of this course are for students to gain insight in the problem domain of Collaborative Design and to get to know the possibilities of methods and techniques to approach this problem domain. The course deals with the social aspects of design processes as well as the technical and organisational aspects. During the lectures and the exercises students experience how creativity and working in teams can have mutual influences. If the distance between members of a design team become larger, this has important effects on the process; the use of proper ICT means then becomes crucial.

7m832CSCW tools. Students gain insight in designing and facilitating design processes and in the specific aspects of multi-disciplinary design. They learn to know the social processes that are important in team-design and how to stimulate creativity in a team. Working in a simulated corporate environment, student find out about various forms of collaboration during the architectural design process, the possible compositions of design teams, the collaboration with other partners during design and the distribution of responsibilities. About our work in this course we have published in 2004 and 2005.

 

Design Systems Prototyping

7m711 1st year MScThis was a course on IT design and development targeting the construction industry. Through a combination of theory and hands-on exercises, students learned to know both the conceptual issues and practical implications of designing and developing a simple information system for a case of their choice. Students would develop an information strategy for their case, design a system using common modelling tools such as IDEF or UML, and build a first prototype with Rapid Application Development tools, like Delphi. Typically this was a database applications, possibly with a web interface. Having completed this course, students would be able to understand the complications of IT development and function as a bridge between construction practice and IT developers. The course Design Systems Prototyping is now superseded by the course ‘Information Technology in Design and Construction’ taught by Dijkstra and Jessurun.

 

Building Information Systems

ADMS/BIS 1st year PDEng ADMSCase study of a design system To effectively and efficiently address complex design problems, the utilisation of ICT tools that are geared for the construction industry is essential. The main objectives for this course are:

  • to get some experience in developing an information strategy for business processes in the construction industry
  • to be able develop an information policy and planning for this process
  • to learn how to specify the objectives and specifications of an information system to support this policy
  • to get some experience in designing such an information system.